Men’s Health Part 1

Interim HealthCare Blogs
Posted: 2/2/2017 1:59 PM by Interim HealthCare
Most men need to pay more attention to their health. Compared to women, men are more likely to:
  • Smoke and drink
  • Make unhealthy or risky choices
  • Put off regular checkups and medical care
There are also health conditions that only affect men, such as prostate cancer and low testosterone. Many of the major health risks that men face - like colon cancer or heart disease - can be prevented and treated with early diagnosis. Screening tests can find diseases early, when they are easier to treat. It's important to get the screening tests you need.

Screenings are tests that look for diseases before you have symptoms. Blood pressure checks and tests for high blood cholesterol are examples of screenings.

You can get some screenings, such as blood pressure readings, in your doctor's office. Others, such as colonoscopy, a test for colon cancer, need special equipment, so you may need to go to a different office.

After a screening test, ask when you will see the results and who you should talk to about them.
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm. If you are between the ages of 65 and 75 and have ever been a smoker, (smoked 100 or more cigarettes in your lifetime) get screened once for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). AAA is a bulging in your abdominal aorta, your largest artery. An AAA may burst, which can cause dangerous bleeding and death.

An ultrasound, a painless procedure in which you lie on a table while a technician slides a medical device over your abdomen, will show whether an aneurysm is present.

Colon Cancer. Have a screening test for colorectal cancer starting at age 50. If you have a family history of colorectal cancer, you may need to be screened earlier. Several different tests can detect this cancer. Your doctor can help you decide which is best for you.

Depression. Your emotional health is as important as your physical health. Talk to your doctor or nurse about being screened for depression, especially if during the last 2 weeks:
  • You have felt down, sad, or hopeless.
  • You have felt little interest or pleasure in doing things.
Diabetes. Get screened for diabetes (high blood sugar) if you have high blood pressure or if you take medication for high blood pressure.

Diabetes can cause problems with your heart, brain, eyes, feet, kidneys, nerves, and other body parts.
Hepatitis C virus (HCV). Get screened one time for HCV infection if:
  • You were born between 1945 and 1965.
  • You have ever injected drugs.
  • You received a blood transfusion before 1992.
  • If you currently are an injection drug user, you should be screened regularly.
High Blood Cholesterol. If you are 35 or older, have your blood cholesterol checked regularly with a blood test. High cholesterol increases your chance of heart disease, stroke, and poor circulation. Talk to your doctor or nurse about having your cholesterol checked starting at age 20 if:
  • You use tobacco.
  • You are overweight or obese.
  • You have diabetes or high blood pressure.
  • You have a history of heart disease or blocked arteries.
  • A man in your family had a heart attack before age 50 or a woman, before age 60.
You know your body better than anyone else. Always tell your doctor or nurse about any changes in your health, including your vision and hearing. Ask them about being checked for any condition you are concerned about, not just the ones here. If you are wondering about diseases such as Alzheimer's disease or skin cancer, for example, ask about them.

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