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Home  >  Blog   >   August 2018   >   Understanding the IADLs That Impact a Parent's Ability to Age at Home

Understanding the IADLs That Impact a Parent's Ability to Age at Home

Posted: 8/31/2018 10:28 AM by Interim HealthCare
Instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) are tasks a senior should be able to do on their own. These activities are not primary activities like being able to eat or drink, but they're important for a senior who wants to age at home independently.
 
As your mom or dad age, it's important to monitor their ability to perform IADLs. If they struggle with them, you should start helping out or bring in caregivers to help. Here are the IADLs, your parent needs to be able to do in order to live at home.
 
Clean the House and Do the Laundry
 
Your parent's home needs to be safe. If your mom or dad can no longer clean the house, the risk of mold, mildew, and germs increases. These can impact their health over time. If your mom can't change the sheets on her bed, she needs help. If your dad struggles to carry laundry down the basement steps, caregivers can.
 
Caregivers can vacuum, dust, sweep, and mop. They can load and run the dishwasher. They can also wipe down counters and make sure cooking utensils are cleaned and sterilized for the next use.
 
Reminders
 
Is your mom or dad paying bills on time? Are you starting to see late payment notices? If managing money is now a problem, someone needs to step in. You don't want your parent's electricity, heat, or water shut off. You also don't want your mom or dad to lose a house to unpaid taxes or an unpaid mortgage/home equity loan. Caregivers can help sort the mail and make sure to tell you when bills are due.
 
Medication reminders is another service available from home care professionals. Your mom or dad will have a caregiver on hand each day to remind your parent to take his or her medications.
 
Schedule Appointments
 
If your mom forgets to make appointments, caregivers can help there too. They can make appointments, set reminders, and drive your mom to the appointment on time.
 
Caregivers will communicate with you if your parent gives permission. This way, you can focus on your own family and job while also staying up-to-date on your parent's health and well-being.
 
If you look at the different services caregivers offer, you'll understand how easy it is to arrange help for your mom or dad. Caregivers can cook meals, run errands, clean the house, and wash and dry clothes and linens. Call a home care agency to learn more.

More informtion about caregivers.

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