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Home  >  Education Center   >   Blog   >   February 2017   >   How to Deal with Long Distance Caregiving for a Loved One with Dementia

How to Deal with Long Distance Caregiving for a Loved One with Dementia

Posted: 2/26/2017 8:30 AM by Interim HealthCare
How to Deal with Long Distance Caregiving for a Loved One with Dementia Being away from your elderly loved one is difficult as a long-distance family caregiver, but if she's diagnosed with dementia, that can make you a little more nervous. Finding ways to compensate for the distance involved can help you and your elderly loved one to feel more at ease.

Learn as Much as You Can about Dementia and Your Loved One's Health
The more that you can learn about dementia in general and your elderly loved one's health in particular, the more prepared you can be for the care she needs. Build a relationship with her doctor so that you can get the most up to date information about her health and any changes. You might even want to consider joining a support group so you can talk to other caregivers in the same situation.

Keep in Touch with Your Loved One Throughout the Day
Even though you're not right there with your elderly loved one, you can still keep in touch with your loved one throughout every day. You can schedule regular calls when you normally have breaks and you might even want to set up video calls when you have longer to talk. Let your loved one know how she can contact you, whether that's via phone, email, or even text messages.

Encourage Your Loved One to Let You Know How She's Really Doing
Your loved one may be reluctant to let you know much about how she's really doing at first. Many elderly loved ones resist being a burden on their family members or being too needy. It's important that your loved one understands that you're concerned about how she's doing and you're concerned about making sure that she has the care that she needs.

Find Someone to Be Your Eyes and Ears
If you have other family members or even neighbors who can check on your elderly loved one for you, this is an excellent way to gain a second or even third perspective on how your loved one is doing. This is especially important if you're not able to visit as often as you would like. You may even want to hire senior care providers if your loved one is needing additional help during the day.

Finding the right balance is essential as a long-distance caregiver to a loved one with dementia.

More information about dementia

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